British Horror Anthology Hell
More Terror In The Modern Vein

Welcome Guest. Please Login or Register.
Apr 24th, 2014, 03:00am




British Horror Anthology Hell
British Horror Anthologies
Mouldy Oldies #2: 1900-1969 (Moderator: demonik)
  More Terror In The Modern Vein
« Previous Topic | Next Topic »
Pages: 1 
   Author  Topic: More Terror In The Modern Vein  (Read 1417 times)

fresh victim


member is offline






Email PM


Posts:
More Terror In The Modern Vein
« Thread started on: Nov 17th, 2006, 11:39am »



More Terror In The Modern Vein Ed. by Donald A. Wollheim (Digit 1955)


'Gone Away' by A. E. Coppard

'The Silence' by Venard McLaughlin

'Mimic' by Donald A. Wollheim

'Shipshape Home' by Richard Matheson

'The Dream Makers' by Robert Bloch

'The Republic Of The Southern Cross' by Valery Brussof

'The Inheritors' - Robert W. Lowndes & John Michel

Not sure if it's the influence of this here Vault but I'm getting a real fondness for these old anthologies Anyone know anything about this one? Hoping to get into it this weekend...

Logged

demonik
Hail Horrors Hail


member is offline



Thirsty Dog


Email PM

Gender: Male
Posts: 4131
Re: More Terror In The Modern Vein
« Reply #1 on: Nov 17th, 2006, 3:25pm »

I'm not sure, but I think there was originally a hardback edition published by Hanover House (also in 1955) which was then reissued as two paperbacks. E. F. Bleiler describes it as "most s-f, but with a little supernatural material." The hardback also includes:

H. P. Lovecraft's He, Ray Bradbury's The Crowd, R. A. Heinlein's They and H. G. Wells' The Croquet Player.

Bloch's The Dream Makers is one of his several stories about Hollywood, but I'm not really familiar with the others you mention save for Coppard's strangely strange Gone Away which is well worth reading. Robert Aickman selected it for the 7th Fontana Ghost book.




Logged

The inn sign ... was in the nature of a coffin supported by six headless bearers goose-stepping towards a white headstone, and underneath this somewhat forbidding daub with grim irony, the legend 'Ye Journey's End' - Guy Preston, The Inn.


fresh victim


member is offline






Email PM


Posts:
Re: More Terror In The Modern Vein
« Reply #2 on: Nov 18th, 2006, 05:11am »

on Nov 17th, 2006, 3:25pm, demonik wrote:
E. F. Bleiler describes it as "most s-f, but with a little supernatural material."


That seems to be about right with the first two stories anyway...

Coppard's Gone Away is certainly strange and unnerving. While on a motoring holiday in France John, his wife Mary and their sour-puss friend Anson, become lost. They begin to notice strange roadsigns and the speedometer of the car indicates they've travelled thousands of miles. They reach a small town and Anson goes off to look for a newspaper but does not return, then Mary goes to look for him and promptly disappears also. A fearful John searches then contacts the police who think him mad and lock him in a cell until a doctor can see him, then...

Well, a weird one it is. Reminding me a little of a 'Twilight Zone' episode, tapping into that fear of being lost...

The Silence by Venard McLaughlin. Not really sure what was going on in this story! Something to do with a being called Sorkt who turns out to be the Serpent from the Garden Of Eden, and a blacksmith with a bellow-less furnace called Luciffe who is awaiting The Silence (presumably the end of the world). I don't think I have a suitable mind-set for sci-fi that enables me to a enjoy a story like this, I just find it baffling! One thing I really liked - it was supposed to be set in the near future...that is 1974 ! (well, it was published mid Fifties)...
« Last Edit: Nov 18th, 2006, 05:12am by » Logged

Calenture
Guest
Re: More Terror In The Modern Vein
« Reply #3 on: Nov 18th, 2006, 06:16am »

on Nov 17th, 2006, 3:25pm, demonik wrote:
Bloch's The Dream Makers is one of his several stories about Hollywood, but I'm not really familiar with the others you mention save for Coppard's strangely strange Gone Away which is well worth reading. Robert Aickman selected it for the 7th Fontana Ghost book.


I can't add much to this, but I love that futuristic cover, which made me think this was a hardback until I saw the Digit imprint and the price. Looking inside my only Digit book (a paperback first edition of Aldiss's The Interpreter) all their other titles listed are SF.

I don't have any of these stories, but an E A Coppard horror story was anthologised in August Derleth's Who Knocks?, which I need to post details of (if it's not already done).

Could the Bloch story be one of those used for Torture Garden?

You've found a very collectable book, I'd say, anyway.
« Last Edit: Nov 18th, 2006, 06:19am by Calenture » Logged


fresh victim


member is offline






Email PM


Posts:
Re: More Terror In The Modern Vein
« Reply #4 on: Nov 18th, 2006, 10:56am »

Must confess Rog , it was another cover that whispered "buy me..." - be nice if it was collectable though

Anyway, here's another two stories...

Mimic by Donald A. Wollheim. New York. The narrator describes the strange man who has lived on his street for years, in his black cloak and wearing his wide brimmed black hat, the man who did not speak and seemed afraid of women. But in New York who notices another eccentric? In the world of nature there are species that can live alongside the predators, surviving unnoticed due to their skill in mimickry. The black cloaked man turns out to be such a creature, disguised as a man but imperfectly when closely examined, more insectlike in fact...

Shipshape Home by Richard Matheson. Rick is a writer by trade, but seemingly with far less imagination than his wife Ruth. She tries to tell him of her suspicions about the creepy janitor who looks like Peter Lorre. He says she reads too many "fantasy pulps"! One day she tells him she's seen through a secret door in the basement, she's seen engines down there and the janitor, he has a third eye - in the back of his head!

Interesting alien conspiracy story. It's not paranoia, they're all around us...
Logged

demonik
Hail Horrors Hail


member is offline



Thirsty Dog


Email PM

Gender: Male
Posts: 4131
Re: More Terror In The Modern Vein
« Reply #5 on: Nov 18th, 2006, 11:24am »

Mimic sounds familiar, though I've no idea where I read it. I've just dug out another Wollheim collection The 2nd Avon Fantasy Reader (1969) which seems to have a similar sf-fantasy-horror bias with a little sword & sorcery thrown in.




Cover: Gray Morrow


More crawling horrors and superheroes from the world of the unthinkable

Robert E. Howard - The Blonde Goddess Of Bal-Sagoth
C. L. Moore - Shambleau
Zealia Brown Bishop - The Curse Of Yig
Clark Ashton Smith - Ubbo-Sathla
Donald Wandrei - The Painted Mirror
Edward Lucas White - Amina
Robert Bloch - The Black Kiss
Laurence Manning & Fletcher Pratt - The City Of The Living Dead
Sax Rohmer - The Curse Of A Thousand Kisses


« Last Edit: Nov 18th, 2006, 11:49am by demonik » Logged

The inn sign ... was in the nature of a coffin supported by six headless bearers goose-stepping towards a white headstone, and underneath this somewhat forbidding daub with grim irony, the legend 'Ye Journey's End' - Guy Preston, The Inn.

Pages: 1 
« Previous Topic | Next Topic »

Monthly Ad-Free Plan!

$6.99 Gets 50,000 Ad-Free Pageviews!

This Board Hosted For FREE By SuddenLaunch
Get Your Own Free Message Board!